how to

How to Make Micro Connectors

If you’re wondering how I made the 1mm ‘bullet’ style connectors for the modified HubSan X4 quadcopters, then it’s really easy to do. They’re made from 25 way D connectors that I bought on the high street from Maplin:

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/maplin-d-sub-connector-25-way-yq48c

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/maplin-d-sub-connector-socket-25-way-yq49d

 

First, you need to separate the shells to get at the white bit inside which holds the pins. The only thing that holds the two shells together are the ‘riveted’ holes either side. When they’re made, the holes are punched through, and it’s only this that’s holding the two halves together. To get them apart you just have to hold the metal containing the holes on the left and right with pliers, working them back and forward and also twisting to make a slot separate which you can insert a screwdriver into. Then you can use the screwdriver to lever the two halves apart. Alternatively, just cut off the hole and you can open it up.

Then separate the two white inner parts with you fingers and all the pins (or sockets) fall out.

The gold connectors then form a male and female pair which you can solder wires on to and then add 1.5mm heat shrink over for insulation and mechanical strength. I was using 15mm long heat shrink for the pins (male) and 20mm long heat shrink for the sockets (female).

Let’s be fair though, I did make 80 of these connectors, and they did work very well when tested to extremes by a class of 13 year olds. The first time you push them together they are a bit tight, but once the heat shrink has stretched they’re easy to use. We had a class of 30 connecting quadcopter motors to flight controllers without any problems. I use this technique on any small connectors that I need because it’s cheap, quick and easy to source the parts on the high street.

Taranis X9D Plus and X8R Binding Problems and “finding device”

This post explains how to fix a Taranis X9D Plus not binding to an X8R receiver and how to fix the “finding device” problem when flashing the X8R with the new firmware.

The Taranis X9D Plus, X8R receiver, a separate 4.8v battery and my test servo

The Taranis X9D Plus, X8R receiver, a separate 4.8v battery and my test servo

I got my hands on a Taranis X9D Plus radio recently and, although I knew it had a steep learning curve, it’s taken me over a week to figure out how to bind the transmitter to the receiver and make it work a servo. That’s really not very good as you expect the transmitter and receiver to just bind and work straight out of the box. To cut a long story short, the transmitter has the new European firmware, while the receiver hasn’t, so they will not talk to each other. The solution is to flash the X8R with the European firmware update from the FrSky website. The only other problem is that, when I tried this, the flash tool refused to recognise the radio. Only after reading the problems that somebody else had and his solution of pulling out the 5v lead and powering the receiver from a separate 4.8v battery did I eventually manage to flash the receiver. So, in order to help anybody else who has had this problem, here are some detailed instructions.

You can tell which firmware the transmitter has from the boot loader screen, or from the model bind menu:

The Taranis bootlader screen showing the firmware revision number

The Taranis bootlader screen showing the firmware revision number as 2.0.9.2-eu

The Taranis model page showing Internal RF mode as D16-eu

The Taranis model page showing Internal RF mode as D16-eu

In order to get into the bootloader menu, you have to push the horizontal trims under the left and right sticks inwards while switching the power on. If the transmitter is mode 2, that equates to right rudder, left aileron, power on. In the Taranis documentation this is referred to as a “three finger salute”, which took me a while to work out.

OK, so the transmitter definitely has the European firmware, but unfortunately there is no way of knowing what firmware the receiver has, so if it refuses to bind then it’s a good idea to flash it with the latest revision.

Download the X8R firmware from the FrSky firmware page: http://www.frsky-rc.com/download/view.php?sort=Firmware&down=205&file=X8R/X6R%20%E2%80%93%20EU%20Version

You will also need the Windows driver: http://www.frsky-rc.com/download/view.php?sort=Tool&down=160&file=Driver-Windows%20XP/7/8/Vista

And the S-Port (SPORT) telemetry upgrade tool which contains the program you need to run to flash the firmware: http://www.frsky-rc.com/download/view.php?sort=Tool&down=115&file=Upgrade%20Lite-S.Port%20Telemetry

In addition to this you need to buy a FrSky USB upgrade cable (FUC-3) and a Smart Port converter cable. I bought mine from Robot Birds, costing about £12 and they posted it first class, so I had it the following day (http://robotbirds.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=85_438_593&products_id=7685 and http://robotbirds.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=85_438_593&products_id=8418).

The two part upgrade cable (FUC-3) is on the left, while the S-Port converter is on the right

The two part upgrade cable (FUC-3) is on the left, while the S-Port converter is on the right

The upgrade cable (left) needs to have the Molex lead unplugged from the USB part (top), which is replaced by the second cable that comes in the pack (bottom). This is then plugged into the S-Port converter (right), making sure that the black leads line up. This is very important as the leads are not polarised and you will damage something if you plug it in the wrong way round.

The upgrade cable has been switched and plugged into the S-Port adapter with the black leads lined up

The upgrade cable has been switched and plugged into the S-Port adapter with the black leads lined up

Now the important bit is to remove the 5v line on the S-Port connector (black servo plug). This is very easy to do with a small screwdriver as you just have to lift up the the black plastic tongue holding the metal connector and pull on the lead gently to prise it out. Don’t use any force, it should slide out easily once the black plastic bit is lifted. The reason for doing this is so that when the receiver is powered from a separate battery you don’t blow up the power supply in the adapter. Ordinarily, the computer’s USB port should power the receiver during the firmware flash process, but the theory is that it doesn’t have enough power, so a separate battery is the best solution. Mine was hanging on the “Finding device” message until I tried the separate battery trick. With the 5v line removed, plug it into the S-Port slot on the side of the receiver.

Remove the 5v power line from the S-Port connector

Remove the 5v power line from the S-Port connector

The Windows device driver install worked fairly easily for me, despite using Windows 10 and the FrSky release notes saying only XP, Vista, 7, 8 and 8.1 are supported. Windows 10 is obviously close enough in driver software for it to still work, although it took me a while to realise that it had. Unzip the “CP210x_VCP_Windows.zip” file that you downloaded earlier, open the directory and double click on the “CP210xVCPInstaller_x64.exe” program to run the installer. If you’re using a 32 bit operating system then use the “x86” version instead.

Taranis_devicedriverdirectory

Double click on the “CP210xVCPInstaller_x64.exe” program to install the device driver

Follow the on screen prompts to install the device driver (take all the defaults), after which it appears as if nothing has happened. Plug the FrSky USB module into the computer now, and open the Windows Device Manager:

The device driver shows the FrSky driver installed and attached to COM3

The device driver shows the FrSky driver installed and attached to COM3

The device driver is now visible as the “Silicon LabsCP210x” USB port on COM3. Remember the COM3 as it’s needed for the next part.

This is the bit that stumped me for a while as I couldn’t figure out where the Go to the “frsky_update_Sport.exe” program mentioned in the instructions was located. It’s actually in the second file which you downloaded, so unzip “FrSky SPORT upgrade adapter.zip” and also unzip the third file you downloaded, “X8RX6R_eu_150602.zip” as this contains the new EU firmware.

The directory containing the "frsky_update_Sport.exe" program to flash the firmware

The directory containing the “frsky_update_Sport.exe” program to flash the firmware

At this point you should have the FrSky adapter plugged into the USB port on the computer, with the other end, the S-Port adapter (servo plug), plugged in to the receiver, but with the 5v lead disconnected. All three zip files downloaded from the FrSky website should have been unzipped and the device driver installed, so the computer is recognising the USB adapter as a COM port. Now the process of flashing the firmware can begin.

The receiver with the modified S-Port cable attached

The receiver with the modified S-Port cable attached

The S-Port attached, separate battery ready to power the receiver and USB plug

The S-Port cable attached, separate battery ready to power the receiver and USB plug. The USB should be plugged into the computer at this point

Right click on “frsky_update_Sport.exe” and choose “Run As Administrator” just to be on the safe side. The following window shows what to expect:

The upload tool looking for the receiver

The firmware upload tool still looking for the receiver

This is the stage where I got stuck for a long time, because I could never get past the “finding device” part. The theory is that there isn’t enough power in the USB port to power the receiver, despite all the lights coming on to show that it has power. This is why the 5v line was removed from the S-Port connector earlier. If you can get it to work without the additional battery then great, but I couldn’t.

Make sure the COM port is set to the correct number from the “Device Manager” part earlier, although the dialog box will only show a limited number of options so you could make an educated guess. Click on the “File” button and browse to where the “X8RX6R_eu_150602.frk” firmware file was downloaded to and select it. Then attach the spare 4.8v battery to any one of the receiver’s channels in order to power it. This is where “finding device” should change to “device found…”.

The device is found and ready for flashing

The device is found and ready for flashing

Press the “Download” button and it should all happen automatically. The firmware flash process can take a few minutes, so don’t unplug anything while it’s happening, or you could render the receiver useless. It’s unlikely, but it can happen.

Once this is complete, disconnect the battery from the receiver, unplug the USB from the computer and disconnect the S-Port cable from the receiver.

Power on the Taranis, go into bind mode so you hear the “beep, beep, beep”, then plug the battery into the receiver while pressing down the F/S button with a small screwdriver.

The bind sequence is power on while holding down F/S

The receiver bind sequence is power on while holding down F/S with Taranis in bind mode

I did the bind without the servo, then powered everything off, then back on again to check that it was all working. Then I added the servo to channel 1 and verified that the transmitter could control it. Success! I’ve now got a radio that actually works.

 

How to Replace a Hubsan Q4 Battery

I’ve flown my Hubsan Q4 rather a lot now as I’m currently on my third battery. For the benefit of anybody also looking to fit a replacement, here’s how easy it is. You don’t even need any tools.

All you need is a Hubsan Q4 battery, part number H111-04. I got mine from Robot Birds for £3.95: [link]

The Hubsan Q4 and new battery

The Hubsan Q4 and new battery

The first step is to remove the white plastic bodyshell, which is done by gently prising the two plastic clips at the front of the Q4 free from the PCB.

Look at the four small white plastic clips holding the bodyshell to the green PCB

Look at the four small white plastic clips holding the bodyshell to the green PCB

Gently push the white clips out and over the PCB

Gently push the white clips out and over the PCB

It’s easiest to remove the front clips first as they can be gently pushed out and up over the PCB. You may be able to move the white plastic body backwards which helps a little.

Once the front clips are out, slide the shell forwards and up to free the two clips at the back, taking care not to break them.

The white shell is lifted free

The white shell is lifted free

Now pay attention to the orientation of the battery and the wiring which we are about to remove.

The battery is exposed, ready for removal

The battery is exposed, ready for removal

Now unplug the existing battery from the PCB, making a note of the orientation. It does have + and – printed on the PCB to help though.

IMG_20150919_103047 IMG_20150919_103058

The battery is attached to the top of the PCB using nothing more than a sticky pad. Take a last look at how the battery is fitted, then just gently pull it free.

The old battery is removed (right) and the new one is ready for installation (left)

The old battery is removed (right) and the new one is ready for installation (left)

Remove the backing paper from the new battery. At this point I put the waxed paper onto the old battery so that it wouldn’t stick to anything. Please dispose of the old battery responsibly, don’t just bin it as it is lithium.

Peel the backing off and get ready to place it on the PCB

Peel the backing off and get ready to place it on the PCB

With the new battery all ready to fit, this is the point where you think, “where did it actually go on?”. My advice is to place the battery where you think it should go (look at the earlier pictures), but DO NOT press it down firmly. In other words, trial fit it, then put the white plastic shell back over the top to check that you have it in exactly the right position. There isn’t a lot of spare space, so it needs to fit right.

Trial fit the battery, making sure the white shell fits over the top

Trial fit the battery, making sure the white shell fits over the top

Once you’re happy with the fit, push it down on the sticky pad and connect the power lead. Make absolutely sure the polarity is right as it is very easy to break the connector if it is the wrong way round. There is a + and – printed on the PCB, plus you can have a look at the old battery as the leads are very stiff and it will have kept its shape.

That's the way to plug the battery in

That’s the way to plug the battery in

Then tidy up the wiring by doubling it up as in the picture, or just copy how the old battery looks. There isn’t much space, so it needs to be neat and tidy.

Finally, put the body shell back on, reversing the procedure you used to get it off. Push the back clips in first, slide and clip the front ones in.

IMG_20150919_103846 IMG_20150919_103925 IMG_20150919_103945 IMG_20150919_104040 IMG_20150919_104119

That’s all there is to it. You should now have a fully working Q4 again.

All back together and no pieces left over

All back together and no pieces left over

It was at this point that I switched it back on and wondered why it didn’t work any more. Obviously you need to charge the new battery before you can use it.

30 minutes later and I’ve got a zippy new Q4 flying around the room again. No more heavy throttle stick and 2 minute flight times. Like I say, I’m on my third battery, so they must be a bit marginal on the current drain to be wearing it out so quickly (or the charger is rubbish). Either way, at £4 at time I can’t really complain as this one will last a few more months.

Replacing a HubSan Q4 Motor

The front left motor on my HubSan Q4 stopped working recently, so I bought some new motors and replaced the broken one. This is a step by step guide to how I accomplished the repair.

The tools you will need to make the repair

The tools you will need to make the repair

In order to make the repair, you need a soldering iron and solder, a screwdriver, tweezers, and pack of new motors. A small pin vice might also be useful, but fingers can work just as well.

Remove the propeller by pulling it gently upwards. They usually come off fairly easily. If it doesn’t then use a soft plastic (or balsa?) implement as a lever between the top of the motor and the base of the prop hub.

Pull the propeller off gently with your fingers.

Pull the propeller off gently with your fingers.

Next, carefully release the motor.

Release the motor from its mount.

Release the motor from its mount.

And push the two white mounting clips inwards to release the white plastic motor mount from the PCB. This leaves the motor free, apart from the two soldered power wires. This is done after lifting the motor upwards and out, otherwise there isn’t enough room for the clips to move in and clear the PCB.

Push the two white plastic clips inwards.

Push the two white plastic clips inwards.

Next, desolder the two motor wires, noting that white is (+) and black is (-), although it’s identical to the other motor. Don’t use too much heat, it should only require an instant to release the wire. This is where the reason for removing the white plastic motor mount first becomes apparent. It’s too close to the solder pads to avoid melting it with the soldering iron otherwise. The picture below went a bit wrong as I accidentally clicked the motor back into place when I put it on the desk to take the picture. Just pretend the motor is hanging through the hole as in the previous shot.

Desolder the old motor.

Desolder the old motor.

Remove the old motor completely and mark it as defective so it won’t get confused with any of the new ones. Select the correct type of new motor from the pack. In this case it’s the black and white wire motor, not the red and blue one.

The new motor and the defective one it replaces

The new motor and the defective one it replaces

Insert the new motor into the plastic mount, making sure to get the wires coming out of the correct side and from the right hole. This is what the tweezers are for, as it’s a very fiddly operation.

The new motor goes into the mount.

The new motor goes into the mount.

Note the position and orientation of the motor wires.

Note the position and orientation of the motor wires.

Now solder the new motor in place. The pictures with the soldering iron are actually posed for the camera. There are two reasons for this: firstly, I don’t solder on a piece of white cardboard and, secondly, I only have two hands. The soldering iron is cold in the photos and propped up precariously on its stand with me holding the tweezers. The pictures show the motor, NOT clicked into position, but held by its powerful magnets against the metal pin vice. This will work well, but I found it just as easy to hold the job with my fingers and solder it that way. Obviously, not burning your fingers is the most important point if you choose to hold it, so only do this if you are confident with a soldering iron and do it every day. If you press the wire down against the PCB so that the exposed part sits on the solder connection, then you can just about get away with it without burning yourself. Otherwise, use the tweezers to press the wire against the PCB and use as little heat as possible. A little solder run onto the wires and pads always helps.

cpa1

Carefully solder the motor wires onto the correct pads.

cap2

The motor isn’t clipped in place at this point, I’ve just poked the wires through the hole in the PCB for now. Magnetism is holding it to the pin vice.

When soldering the wires, make sure to get the direction of wire entry to the solder pad correct. This will aid with tidying up the wiring afterwards and make sure it doesn’t catch on anything. They both point inwards like in the picture.

It's important to point the wires inwards.

It’s important to point the wires inwards.

At this point I like to test that the electrical connections are all good and that it all works as expected. In order to see the motor spin, I’ve attached a piece of tape to the spindle.

The tape allows you to see the motor spin. Buzz the throttle lightly and see that it works.

The tape allows you to see the motor spin. Buzz the throttle gently and see that it works.

That’s almost it, but you have to release the motor from the plastic mount as if you were going to take it out, then push the white mount fully into the PCB before replacing the motor. The reason for this is that there isn’t enough clearance for the mount to go into the PCB with the motor taking up all the space inside. Also, note in the picture two small plastic lugs which must be carefully located into a cut-out in the circular PCB hole. If you look at the circular hole carefully, you can just see the cut-out to the left of the “B” where the two wires are disappearing underneath.

Don't push all the way yet!

Don’t push all the way yet!

Release the motor to make space to click the mount in.

Pull the plastic over the top of the motor apart while simultaneously pushing the motor upwards to gently release it.

Pull the plastic over the top of the motor apart while simultaneously pushing the motor upwards to gently release it.

Now push the white motor mount downwards to click it fully into place. The white plastic is quite brittle, so it’s important not to use too much force. Slip the motor to one side before pushing down so that it reduces the stress and the lever effect as the clips go in. Otherwise you can crack the mount. In other words, make sure the motor isn’t pushing the top lugs outwards when you push the mount down into place.

The motor is now released.

The motor mount is now in position and the motor is about to follow.

cap

A different view showing how the mount fits into the PCB.

Finally, push the motor back into place and fit the propeller.

The motor back in position.

The motor back in position.

Push the prop back on.

Push the prop back on.

And we’re ready to go flying again!

TX on, RX on, blinking, bind, ready to go.

TX on, RX on, blinking, bind, ready to go.

Everything works and it lifts up into the air again. I’ve never managed to film myself flying it yet, because every time I try and get the quadcopter into the camera’s view I lose control and crash into something.

Also, don’t forget that the trim is likely be a long way out after changing the motor, so you might want to do a trim reset first on a level surface. Mine was drifting back and right quite a lot, but I was just happy to be flying it around again. I have a knack for finding the neutral operating point after years of test flying other people’s models and have a habit of just flying models the way they are. I’m not sure if that’s a strength or a weakness, but I have had a few occasions where I’ve flown a model seemingly perfectly, then, when somebody else flew it after me, they nearly crashed. There was that electric glider that went vertical immediately after launch which was a bit of a shock for the pilot, but I probably shouldn’t mention that.

How to Replace a Hubsan X4 Quadcopter Motor

This article shows how to replace a motor on a HubSan X4 quadcopter. The items required for this job are:

  • A replacement Hubsan X4 motor, H107-AO3 (mine were purchased as a pack of 4 for £14.95 from RobotBirds).
  • Small Philips Screwdrivers
  • Tweezers or small pliers
  • Soldering Iron and solder
The tools required

The tools required.

These are the tools required for the repair. I’m actually using a 60W soldering iron, which I use for most jobs, but a smaller one will do.

My Hubsan is over two years old now, so it’s the original version without the LEDs on the motors. Also, as it’s getting rather old, the black plastic case is on its last legs and is missing a few bits of plastic here and there.

The top right motor is the faulty one which is going to be replaced.

The Hubsan X4 being operated on - the top right motor is faulty

The Hubsan X4 being operated on – the top right motor is faulty.

The first job is to turn it over and remove the outer case. This is done by removing the three Philips screws and popping the arms out of the motor pods. I find that it’s easier to remove the single screw at the top, pop out the top two arms and then remove the final two screws at the sides.

Bottom casing removed, note the damage to the plastic case.

Bottom casing removed, note the damage to the plastic case.

Next, carefully remove the two screws holding the PCB onto the top casing. While it is possible to make the repair with the PCB in place, I found it easier to remove it in order to access the wiring.Notice that I’ve put the screws back into their threads in the top casing in order to avoid losing them. The bottom case screws have also been inserted into the case, which I’ve put to one side.

The PCB is removed.

The PCB is removed.

The motor is removed by pulling it through the top, i.e. the propeller “upwards” direction. You can see from the picture that mine suffered damage by striking a wall from the top, driving the armature through the bottom of the weak plastic motor back plate.

Make sure to free the wiring from the motor to the PCB first so that the motor is free to move. In my case, the back plate and motor can were in two separate parts, and, with the propeller still firmly attached to the motor, it was an easy job to pull the motor out of its mounting. If this is not the case, use duct tape (or sellotape), stuck around the exposed top part of the motor can to pull it free. You could use pliers to do this if you don’t mind damaging the motor though. In my case, I had forgotten to take one of the earlier pictures, so I had to remove the good motor and put it back again later. The motor is just a friction fit, so the tape method works very well.

The defective motor is pulled out through the top

The defective motor is pulled out through the top.

Now comes the soldering part. Make sure the iron is fully up to temperature before attempting the soldering. On a PCB this small, temperature is critical. DO NOT allow the joint to heat up too much, or the PCB will be damaged. I’m using a 60W soldering iron, but I do have a lot of soldering experience. The hot iron allows me to get the heat into the joint very quickly to melt the solder, but I’m using less than a second of contact with the iron on the solder pad. Use a smaller iron if that’s what works best for you.

Anyway, introduce a LITTLE heat to the plus and minus solder pads where the black and red motor wires connect and allow the wires to come away from the PCB. The wiring can now be pulled through the motor mount hole and the defective motor removed completely.

Use as little heat as possible to de-solder the motor wires

Use as little heat as possible to de-solder the motor wires.

Motor wires removed.

Motor wires removed.

And the defective motor is removed.

And the defective motor is removed.

Now, locate the correct replacement motor. I found that, in my pack of four, there were two with red and blue leads and two with black and white leads. This matches the diagonals on the quadcopter (top left and bottom right, top right and bottom left looking from the top). My old motor was one with red and blue leads, so I selected an identical replacement from the pack of four. I can only assume that this is something to do with the direction of rotation, but I don’t know what the differences are. It is possible that the timing on the different motor directions is different, but I don’t actually know the reason for the difference, or whether a white/black motor can be used as a replacement for a red/blue one. They only cost a couple of pounds each, so its sensible to replace like with like.

The new motor is pushed through the mount into position, after which the wiring can be put into position.

Four motors.

Four motors.

Wiring goes in first.

Wiring goes in first.

Then push the motor through. Make sure of the orientation so that the wiring sits flat.

Then push the motor through. Make sure of the orientation so that the wiring sits flat.

When the motor is pushed into position, make a note of the rotation of the motor in relation to the wires. The blue and red wires need to be in line so that the wiring sits neat and flat in the motor pod. Look at how the wiring for the other motors has been accomplished and copy that. Here, it’s worth pointing out that the wires on my new motor are slightly thicker than the ones on the motor that it is replacing. While this is good in terms of quality, it also makes it a bit harder to push the wires into the slots that need to hold them securely in place.

In order to solder the wires in place, I fixed them in place at the motor end before attempting to solder. I also freshened the solder pads on the PCB and ends of the motor wires very carefully with some solder just to wet them and increase my chances of a good joint.

Don't use too much heat!

Don’t use too much heat!

Solder complete.

Solder complete.

Hold the wires in place while soldering any way that you’re comfortable with. Use fingers if you can do it without burning yourself (also prevents you using too much heat), or use tweezers of small pliers. My advice is to stick one wire to the pad any way you can, then do the other one. Now both have a mechanical joint, it’s easier to hold both in place together and add a little more heat if you want to remake a joint that you’re not happy about. Solder joints should be shiny and rounded, not dull and pitted, which is an indicator of a dry joint. You can give the wires a little pull if you want to check.

My soldering here isn’t actually all that good, but the key is good enough. Heat is the enemy, don’t melt the PCB and make the tracks come off.

The next thing to do is check whether this actually works. Put the propeller back on and connect up the LiPo.

It blinks, it beeps, it binds!

It blinks, it beeps, it binds!

Put the propeller on and see if it spins.

Put the propeller on and see if it spins.

OK, it seems to work, so put it back together and see if it flies.

Place the wiring back neatly in the guides.

Place the wiring back neatly in the guides.

Loop the motor wires underneath the PCB.

Loop the motor wires underneath the PCB.

Place the wiring back neatly into the guide slots in the motor pod, arm and joint into the main body. I used a small flat blade screwdriver for this, but something non-metallic would be better. Make sure to loop the motor wires underneath where the PCB sits, ensuring that they do not obstruct the PCB’s screw hole. When all the wiring is neat and tidy, screw the PCB back on.

Screw the PCB back on.

Screw the PCB back on.

And finally, put the bottom half of the case back, making sure to be careful when popping the arms back into their correct places. My case is so badly wrecked, it probably doesn’t matter any more.

The little Hubsan is as good as new.

The little Hubsan is as good as new.

That’s it, now go and fly the X4 to make sure it’s all good. You might have to do the “Expert mode, full right rudder, zero throttle, waggle ailerons left and right until the eyes blink” trick to reset the trim on a horizontal surface. Mine flew fine as it was though.

I would say it flies like a bird, but actually, think, “angry hornet with attitude…”.